Acts of Kindness
State trooper stops man from taking his life
Officers were called because a distraught man was seen on the bridge's edge ready to jump. Among the officers there was Trooper Paul O’Connor who changed everything.
Jaclyn Abergas
06.24.22

Whenever we hear stories of people who died from suicide, a lot of us always wish we could have done something to stop them.

Although when we see someone in the flesh attempt to do it, we freeze because we don’t know what to do.

Pexels - Pixabay
Source:
Pexels - Pixabay

The best thing we can do is to call the police who have been trained to handle situations like that.

On June 5, 2022, the Massachusetts State Police received a call about a man on Tobin Bridge threatening to jump from the southbound upper deck.

The man had already crossed the barrier and could jump at any point. Massachusetts State Police Trooper Paul O’Connor, Sergeant Peter Sennott, and Trooper Randy Roach were the ones who talked to the man to gain his trust.

Pexels - Kindel Media
Source:
Pexels - Kindel Media

They arrived there at around 12:04 pm.

Even the State Police Marine Unit arrived and situated themselves under the bridge, just in case.

It turns out they weren’t needed, which is a good thing. A little after 12:30 pm, Trooper O’Connor and the others were able to successfully convince the man to turn around to the other side of the fence, the safe side.

Pexels - Quang Nguyen Vinh
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Pexels - Quang Nguyen Vinh

In this photo, Trooper O’Connor sat with the man for comfort and support while they waited for the EMS.

The EMS took the man to the nearest Boston hospital so he could be evaluated and given the help he needs to survive his battle. Sgt. Sennott, a Troop H patrol supervisor and a member of the Crisis Negotiation Unit, rode with the man in the ambulance.

It’s very important to accompany the victim through every step to make them feel they are not alone.

And it’s a good reminder for us, especially when we know someone personally who is going through mental health struggles and contemplating suicide.

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Pexels - mododeolhar

Would you like to know a few myths debunked about suicidal tendencies to help with understanding people going through this a little better?

Pexels - mentatdgt
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Pexels - mentatdgt

A lot of people believe that if you discuss suicide with someone contemplating it that it’s putting ideas in their head.

People who have been contemplating suicide have been thinking about it for some time, not just for a couple of days. But they don’t talk about it because they’re scared others will think they’re crazy or judge them.

“…most are actually relieved to have another person question them about their suicidal thoughts because it gives them the opportunity to discuss their fears and concerns. Many people express suicidal intentions or make suicidal gestures because they’re really hoping to be rescued,” Dr. Laurence Miller, a US-based clinical, forensic and police psychologist, wrote.

Pexels - Mental Health America
Source:
Pexels - Mental Health America

A lot of people also believe that the ones who threaten they’ll commit suicide will not do it anyway.

Sometimes, that’s true. But there are times when it is true. And you’ll never know if a suicidal threat is real or not until something happens. And by then, it’s too late. Are you really going to risk that?

True or not, always treat suicidal threats as the real thing. If the person doesn’t do it, then that’s always a good thing.

Pexels - Mental Health America
Source:
Pexels - Mental Health America

Once a person has been successfully talked out of committing suicide or their mood has improved, it does not mean that the chances of it happening again are now zero to nil.

It can happen again. So always make it a point to be there for support.

Pexels - Mental Health America
Source:
Pexels - Mental Health America

And if you know someone who is in danger of killing themselves, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

By Jaclyn Abergas
hi@sbly.com
Jaclyn Abergas is a contributor at SBLY Media.
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